actual knitting content, strategic hat reserve

When you live in this part of the Northeast, winter is always coming. So we knit hats (and scarves and cowls and gloves) throughout the year because they are always needed. Especially when you have children with a knack for forgetting where they’ve left them. Which is all children.

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The pattern is Caramel Brûlée. The yarn is “spectral” from Spirit Trails Fiberworks and is all that. Seriously. The pompom came with the yarn and is really the main reason I wanted to make the hat. I love a good pompom. 

Hat is now in the strategic hat reserve, where it will wait to be deployed.


actual knitting content: shiny!

I love knitting with beads. Really, really. I mean, not all of the time, certainly, but playing around with shiny stuff is always a nice break. 

Which is why I knitted a necklace:

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It came as a kit from Earthfaire. The hardest part, frankly was threading the beads onto the silk yarn. The rest zipped right along.

I love it - but it is a little much for routine office wear. Anyone have a gala I can crash?


knitting your protest

I've spent the last two weeks knitting pink pussyhats. I don't plan to wear them to the Women's March on Washington myself, not because of a lack of desire but because I'll be 30,000 feet in the air when the march is marching. But I do have two friends going....

1.

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2. 

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3.

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The yarn is Valley Yarns Goshen (in Bright Pink, just in case you couldn't work out the color). I didn't want to use the called for wool because I know that at least one of the women I'm knitting for is a delicate flower who gets itchy from sheep-based yarns. I messed about with the stitch count, too, because my first hat seemed a little big and, um, floppy. Which is likely not what one wants from a pussyhat.

All three hats will go to the march, though. I'm sure there will be someone willing to wear the spare.

For a pattern and more info, click here.


lemons = cashmere

Every now and again -- if by "now and again" you read "every few minutes" -- I ask myself "why am I not in Italy right now?" All of my answers, while sensible, are highly unsatisfying. I mean, seriously? Why am I not in Italy right now?

For when those moments surface, I've made wee little neck warmer from yarn purchased at Chianti Cashmere in Tuscany

Before I get to the pictures of the finished item, a brief flurry of photos from the trip:

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The Teen, with two goats.

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The Boy, feeding Jellybean. 

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Jellybean and my legs. I was in her way and she's very shy.

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Nora Kravis, whose goats they are.

For the scarf, I used the Madison scarf pattern, needles of some size I can no longer remember, and about two weeks:

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The beads are from a long ago trip to Prague:

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The color is more true in the top picture. Cameras are weird. 

So that's what's making me happy this week, even though I am most decidedly not in Italy right now.

 

 


yes, I still knit

So I finished a ... thing?

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Thanks to the Knitter's Review Retreat's stash lounge, I wound up with a weird skein that had weird balls already attached. It wanted to be a cowl. Now, it has fulfilled its destiny.

(No, I can't remember the name of the yarn or who made it. It's a mystery.)


knocked out.

I still do knit. 

During the last AMR podcast, which was with the delightful Kristin Porter, I mentioned that I was knitting knockers. And, yes, the project is pretty much what you think it is. 

Lucy helped my ball up my yarn, which is CoBaSi (a cotton, bamboo, silk, and nylon blend (and I guess the name CoBaSiNy was taken?)) DK from the Makers Mercantile kit. Lucy helped me wind the ball.

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She's very helpful.

And I started my knocker during an episode of Jessica Jones*:

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A few days later, two knockers had been knocked out:

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The one on top has been loosely stuffed with cotton balls. I intend to ship them flat but wanted to get an idea of what they'd look like. And, of course, I'll weave in that end. I'm not going for a whole stripper-tassel vibe, just got ahead of myself with the stuffing and picture taking.

The back:

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The back opening is designed so that the wearer can customize the level of stuffing/firmness. 

(For those inclined to knit a few: it's an easy knit once you get the first few rounds down. One skein of CoBaSi(Ny) made two C-cup size, with a walnut of yarn left over. Additionally, if you are like me, this yarn will remind you why you don't tend to knit with cotton but that it is worth the finger strain for a good cause.)

Now I'm back to working on my endless Fair Isle scarf, which I'll get around to taking pictures of soon. Lord knows it won't be finished anytime soon. 

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* Short review: the first few episodes are kind of meh. But when it picks up, holy sweet cowbells, is it good, so good that knitting is the only thing that keeps me from exploding from the narrative tension. ** Two warnings: NOT for kids and, if you have issues that trigger, pretty much all of them will be, including but not limited to needles in eyeballs. 

** David Tennant is so, so good. I know you don't need me to tell you that but he's even better than you think.


actual knitting content, one for me

I've made a few Vintage Velvet scarves, all of which went to other people. When I noticed that Jimmy Beans Wool had Muench Touch Me on super-duper sale, I decided to make one for me. Finally.

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(The Teen served as a model. She was unwilling. So it goes.)

I love, love, love this yarn because it's buttery soft and, given the wool core, can be machine washed, which tightens it up a bit. It will really come alive once it has been worn a few billion times and fluffs back up again. 

For now, though, it goes into the "pull it out in the fall" bin. Although, given how cool and damp this summer has been so far ....


actual knitting content + a dog

Just in time for the summer swelter, I finished my Fiddlehead Mittens. They were great fun to knit and I'll likely whip up another pair some day.

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(Actually, I finished them about a month ago. I just got around to taking a picture and putting them in the winter gear storage box.)

The yarn is from Foxfire Fiber and I picked it up in January in Pawtucket, Rhode Island. As one does.

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The lining is a peachy pink color that refuses to photograph well. 

As for what's on the needles now -- I just finished a scarf, whose picture I'll take sooner rather than later. I also have two socks-in-progress but I don't really like either of them and am finishing out of a sense of duty. There are a couple of projects currently on the time-out shelf that may be due for a re-visit. Other than that, though, I've got nothing. What should I knit next?

In other news, HRH Lucy would like to say "Hello."

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actual knitting content

This winter has seen the death of two pairs of gloves. Two. Feh, I say.

I picked up a fiddlehead mitten kit from Barbara Parry when I was at the Slater Mill Knitting Weekend. I'll never get them done in time to use this winter, I thought to myself, because soon we'll be past the worst of the weather.

Today I blocked the outer shells:

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I'll still need to knit the liners. Surely the winter weather will be done by the time I get that part done. Please say yes.

This photo, taken yesterday, might help you with your prediction.

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actual knitting content!

I have been working on a linen stitch scarf for what feels like ten or 11 years.* It is done.

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And the twisted fringe, which I spent most of the Superbowl working on.

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I love how twisted fringe looks; I find making it beyond tedious. Still! Done. And satisfying.**

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I love the subtle tones that developed. The kit is from Churchmouse Yarns on Bainbridge Island, which we visited summer before last when we visited Scott's sister in Seattle. The colors kind of remind me of that day, which was a lovely if oddly fraught one. I'm totally ready to go back, though. 

This is one of those few projects that I knew where it was going before I finished it. And since the recipient reads the blog .... well. Maybe I'll get her to take a picture after it is delivered.

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* Six months. Just one of those projects that feels like it will. never. end.

** Snow makes a good background, I guess. We certainly have enough of it.