qotd, 30-year old dudes

Through her fund-raising and Off the Sidelines PAC, Gillibrand has raised close to $6 million for women candidates in the past five years. “I will help you run,” she tells a young woman who says she’s thinking of entering politics at a recent event at the Manhattan women’s club, the Wing. “It doesn’t matter if you haven’t worked your way up. The guys run every time. I can’t tell you how many 30-year-old dudes believe they should be senator or president. Women, we’re like, ‘Well, maybe after ten years of working …’ No. Just run for the office you want to run for and run on the issue you want to fix.”

-- My Senator, Kirsten Gillibrand, who I love.


qotd, the patriarchy

New pod with yrs trly and Sarah Bowen Shea at Another Mother Runner. We talked with Big Fit Girl Louise Green and I had a revelation.

Now, the quote:

"P.S. If you want a customer for life, make a single commercial that features a man fulfilled by yogurt, scrubbing the kitchen, making dinner for his family, and admiring his carpet. That's the 'normal' I'm looking for."

-- Stephanie Pearl-McPhee, from The Amazing Thing About the Way it Goes.


qotd, but a b ain't one

"Before I understood the link between my beliefs and my feelings – and we are talking well into adulthood – and before I found a good way to regain custody of my feelings, my solution was to eat. Eating is sometimes the perfect solution, but only for one or two problems, like hunger. I always seemed to have, as the song goes, 99 problems. Which is another way of saying I weighed far too much."

-- Max Daniels on Taking Custody of your Emotions


qotd, even Honest Abe

"And for that matter, may I call as my witness Abraham Lincoln, who is reported to have walked up and down the street in Springfield, Ill., in the mid-1800s, pulling his young sons in a wagon while reading a book (and as the story goes, he went right on reading when a child fell out of the wagon)."

-- Dr. Perri Klass, The Guilty Secret of Distracted Parenting

For the record, I read a lot of magazines while the kids were young. They were easier to carry and the articles were better suited to my non-existent attention span.


qotd, what you defend against

"I believe that what you defend against actually becomes stronger. This movement of people who want it to go back to the way it was before . . . time does not go back. Time goes forward. Time is actually right now. So those people, they’ve all been hoodwinked, and we all knew it. We know this trick. That’s why education is so important in our culture, because you don't have to look far back in history to know who’s used these same tactics before. That’s why it’s so dangerous. And the fact that people would fall for them again? You think, ‘Wait a minute, you don’t remember the last time this happened?’ [laughs] My thing is, I think that this whole administration will actually accelerate what they’re trying to defend against. What you defend against persists, and I think it’s a call to action for all of the like-minded people like ourselves to get involved."

-- RuPaul in Vanity Fair.


qotd, anyone know an economist?

The reason that the rich were so rich, Vimes reasoned, was because they managed to spend less money.
Take boots, for example. He earned thirty-eight dollars a month plus allowances. A really good pair of leather boots cost fifty dollars. But an affordable pair of boots, which were sort of OK for a season or two and then leaked like hell when the cardboard gave out, cost about ten dollars. Those were the kind of boots Vimes always bought, and wore until the soles were so thin that he could tell where he was in Ankh-Morpork on a foggy night by the feel of the cobbles.
But the thing was that good boots lasted for years and years. A man who could afford fifty dollars had a pair of boots that’d still be keeping his feet dry in ten years’ time, while the poor man who could only afford cheap boots would have spent a hundred dollars on boots in the same time and would still have wet feet.
This was the Captain Samuel Vimes ‘Boots’ theory of socioeconomic unfairness.
-- Terry Pratchett, Men at Arms.

qotd, not here to play

"Where does she find the energy, y'all? She is trying to single-handedly strap this country to her back and carry it to safety. And, no, she doesn't care if the country wants to go or not. Rep. Waters is that Auntie who attacks your face with a wet wipe at every cookout and has a ninja-like ability to whip a comb out and run it through your hair before you can ever protest. She is not trying to have you out in these streets looking a fool and embarrassing her, America! You need to straighten up and act like you have some good sense before she calls your mother on you."

-- R. Eric Thomas on Maxine Waters.