only marignally about VD
up with figs, Edwina explains it all for you

many things make a post

* The Malcolm Gladwell Book Generator.

* Last night and tonight mark on of my favorite events of the year: the Westminster dog show. I don't know why I love it but I do. The accidental poetry of the breed standards might have something to do with it.

* Dear universe: if you could somehow see fit to deliver me to this particular panel at SXSWi without it involving taking time off from work in order to get to Texas and back, I'd appreciate it. Ditto this event with Mr Habit in Iceland.  I await your reply. Love, me.

* If you're in the area, the Paper Ink Voice show on campus is small but mighty. I want Casey Stock's work but can't figure out how to get my hands on it. How can you be an artist in the 21st century and not have some kind of website/blog?

* Lake Stitcher Lee on prom catalogs. 

* This could make my love of crafting gum wrapper chains really pay off.

* The Guardian's Bidisha's essay on pubic hair is, perhaps, the funniest thing I've read this week. And I will never, ever be able to look at a chamois without giggling.

* The NYT's Disunion blog about the Civil War is a marvel. 

* Two from NPR: Why girls like horses and unicorns and a bit from Prairie Home Companion, which is better to listen to than to read.

* If you like your cars steam-driven and your corsets tight, head to Waltham, MA, in May.

* Katha Pollitt on the lack of women writers in the big magazines. I love her.

* Dooce's experience in the ER with her husband is almost exactly what it would be like with Scott and I, horrible jokes included.

* The lengths the 127 Hours set designer went to.

Comments

Am I the only one who reads Malcolm Gladwell and says, "Well, duh"?

You gotta watch the jokes in the hospital. When you do it, you seem "fine" and then they don't give you pain killers when you cut your effing finger off. For reals.

Thanks for the link to the NYTimes article. My mother's family in Charles City, VA are descended from the slaves who worked and lived on Tyler's Sherwood Forest Plantation.

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